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  • The host labelled "bgp" is our Internal BGP Speaker. It sits inside our SDN network, and its job is to peer with all the External BGP Routers, learn BGP routes from them, and relay those routes to the SDN-IP application running on ONOS.
  • The other four hosts, labelled r1 through r4, are the External BGP Routers. They are the border routers that reside in other networks that want to exchange traffic with us.
  • Behind each router is a host, and these are labelled h1 through h4 in Mininet. ONOS can't see these hosts, because the they reside in other network networks that are not controlled by ONOS. 

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To make r4 advertise a new route, we have to change the configuration of the BGP router. In our case, the BGP router is a Quagga process, so we'll connect to the Quagga CLI and configure r4 to advertise a new route. (The Quagga CLI is complex and includes lots of options, but considering this is not a Quagga tutorial we don't have the time to explain too much about Quagga. If you're interested, there's material online that will help you understand Quagga).

First, from the Mininet CLI we can start up an xterm so we can connect to the Quagga CLI.

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We can use telnet to connect to the Quagga BGP CLI.

Code Block
root@ubuntu:~# telnet localhost 2605
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
Hello, this is Quagga (version 0.99.23).
Copyright 1996-2005 Kunihiro Ishiguro, et al.

User Access Verification
Password: 

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Now our external router r4 has advertised a new route to our SDN network. Now weWe're done with the xterm window, so you can close it. Let's go back to our ONOS terminal and see if ONOS has received the new route.

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